Video: Planting Unique Trees May Protect Denver From EAB

Video: Planting unique trees may protect Denver from EAB

  • September 6, 2017

DENVER — Getting the word out about the emerald ash borer (EAB) and its potential impact on Denver’s 330,000 ash trees is a full-time job, and our friends at 9NEWS — more specifically, the producers of the show “Colorado & Company” — have been a big help.

Our very own friendly Denver City Forester Rob Davis appeared on the show recently, explaining whether EAB has been found in Denver, how many vulnerable ash trees we have in Denver and why they’re valuable, how you can identify an ash tree, the tell-tale signs of EAB, whether it makes sense to keep or replace your ash, your EAB treatment options, the city’s plan to treat Denver’s public ash trees and potential trees you can plant besides ash to help diversify and protect our urban tree canopy.

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CPR: Denver Proactive In Battling Emerald Ash Borer

CPR: Denver proactive in battling emerald ash borer

  • August 25, 2017

DENVER — If Denver City Forester Rob Davis is looking to get under his family’s collective skin, all he has to do is start climbing an ash tree looking under the bark for signs of emerald ash borer (EAB).

“I drive them crazy, because I do it all the time,” Davis told Colorado Public Radio. “I’m always looking for (EAB). I’ve even climbed trees at a middle school, just thinking I’m going to find it. So sure.”

EAB is yet to be discovered in Denver, but consider its discovery in Boulder in 2013 and in Lafayette earlier this year, the Mile High City desperately wants to be prepared for what Davis called “single most destructive urban pest that Denver will ever have in its urban forest.”

From Denver’s interactive ash tree map to its efforts to guide residents about their treatment options to this very website and campaign, BeASmartAsh.org, Davis went on to explain to CPR in detail the $2.97 million, 10-year plan the city has implemented to try to cement Denver’s legacy as one of preparedness when it comes to EAB.

(Photo Credit: Colorado Public Radio)

Emerald Ash Borer Treatment Options For Your Denver Ash Tree

Emerald ash borer treatment options for your Denver ash tree

  • August 1, 2017

DENVER — The emerald ash borer (EAB), which feeds on ash trees and is now the most destructive forest pest in U.S. history, has arrived in Colorado, and it’s knocking on Denver’s door. That fact is overwhelming in its own right.

But you might find yourself even more overwhelmed by all the treatments options available to protect your ash tree from EAB. That’s where we come in!

For starters, there are four treatment options that have been examined at length as part of a multi-state insecticide study from Colorado State, Ohio State, Michigan State and Purdue universities. Below is a breakdown of each option.

You might also be happy to know that your Friendly Denver City Forester has put together a list of Certified Smart Ash tree professionals, all of whom have the right mix of know-how and tools to safely and effectively protect your tree from EAB.

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Downtown Denver Replaces Ash Trees Threatened By Emerald Ash Borer

Downtown Denver replaces ash trees threatened by emerald ash borer

  • November 7, 2016

(DENVER POST) — Emerald ash borer (EAB), now the most destructive forest pest in U.S. history, was discovered in Boulder in 2013. It’s yet to arrive in Denver, but that hasn’t stopped the Downtown Denver Partnership from planning ahead. Working with the City and County of Denver’s “Be A Smart Ash” program, the DPP has removed and replaced many of the ash trees in the downtown corridor.

“We’re tying to get as many trees in public right of ways before losing trees to emerald ash borer,” said Sara Davis, program manager for the city’s forestry office.

3 Great Spots To See The Fall Colors In Denver

3 great spots to see the fall colors in Denver

  • October 18, 2016

DENVER — You procrastinated that trip to Colorado’s high country to see the fall colors, didn’t you? If so, we’ve got some good news and some bad news for you.

The bad news: As of mid to late October, most of the aspen trees in the mountains have already lost their leaves. The good news: There is still plenty of gorgeous fall color to be viewed right here in Denver!

But do yourself a favor: Don’t put it off this time. This week and upcoming weekend are your last best chances to view some of the splendid autumn foliage in the Mile High City, accentuated by ash trees that turn a whole host of colors from yellow to orange to red to purple.

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